Blog: 2017

Senior Care: Identifying Symptoms of Mental Disorders

When it comes to dealing with emotional health, seniors are at a disadvantage. Over 20% of adults age 60+ suffer from mental or neurological disorders, the most common of which are dementia and depression.  
While some seniors may have been dealing with mental health issues for years, many will not develop these problems until later in life. Because the stigma surrounding mental illness makes people reluctant to seek help, the issues may go unidentified. This is dangerous, not only because of the risk of suicide but because mental and physical health are inextricably linked. Older adults with longstanding physical health conditions are more likely to become depressed, and untreated depression can negatively affect the outcome of a physical disease.

Do You Have Your Legal Documents in Order?

It’s a good idea to review your legal documents every year to make sure each document is complete and up-to-date.

In previous articles, such as Planning For Life’s Unexpected Turns, we have covered a few cornerstones of estate planning. In this reading, we discuss three essential legal documents—the Health Care Proxy, Power of Attorney, and Will—and the risks we take without them.

If there is one thing to know about your Health Care Proxy, Power of Attorney, and Will, it is that they are the primary way to ensure that your wishes are made a priority in the event of an accident, incapacity, or death.

The Price of Falling

The ability to sustain one’s balance or to have the resilience to get back up relatively unscathed after a fall is something often taken for granted by the young and the healthy. For older individuals, and those with chronic illnesses, a fall is a serious mishap and can greatly impact their subsequent quality of life.

Every year, approximately 1 in 4 Americans over the age of 65 experience a fall, which may or may not land them in the hospital.

Prepare Before the Emergency. Here’s What You Need!

It’s hurricane season. As we brace for these large storms along the coast, other parts of the US are battling the unexpected: wildfires and extreme heat waves in the west. The time to prepare for the unexpected is before it happens. Most don’t anticipate or plan for these types of disasters, but consider the following hypotheticals:

  • Does your mother with Alzheimer's have aides who know what to do if the electricity goes out in her building (like during Superstorm Sandy)?
  • Can your uncle in a wheelchair be easily evacuated in the case of a fire?
  • Is there a plan in place for your aunt who has no air conditioning in the event of a major heatwave?
  • Are there copies of all vital documents for you and each family member and insurance policies somewhere safe?
  • What are the things you want to grab as you evacuate in a flood or fire?

How Can a Professional Organizer Ease Anxiety & Reduce Stress?

While in search of rubber bands at his friend Andrea’s house, Tom opened a bureau drawer to find it completely filled with light bulbs and soap. In anyone else’s house he might have been confused, but this combination was only one of the unconventional organizing methods employed in Andrea’s house.

Andrea has social anxiety, trouble using conventional organization methods, and is prone to memory lapses, which make her reluctant to discard old belongings.


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