Blog: February 2015

Coming Home from Rehab: A Checklist for Success

Coming Home from Rehab: A Checklist for Success By Diane Lansing{4:45 minutes to read} When Robert had a stroke, and we were informed that he was in rehab, we suggested the family hire a geriatric care manager to help coordinate care in the facility, but the idea was not accepted.

Then, when it came time for Robert to go home from the rehab facility, we suggested that the family hire a geriatric care manager to coordinate the transition home. However, the family chose to handle everything themselves. The family took on much more than they had planned for as they worked to put in place the services that Robert would need, and addressed emergencies.

The family hired a home health aide agency to provide round-the-clock care for Robert. Durable Medical Equipment was ordered, but lack of communication from the vendor had the son frantic as to whether the hospital bed, wheelchair, walker and commode would arrive in time.

Small Estates Can Require Large Amounts of Work

Small Estates Can Require Large Amounts of Work{Time to read: 4 minutes} Emily died at the ripe old age of 98 with no assets other than $2,000 in her bank account and the minimal contents of her apartment. She was an award-winning novelist and a writer for The New Yorker. Emily lived a simple comfortable life right to the very end, but her long life used up her assets.

Consequently, the search began for how to avoid probating the estate. The way to do that, Gideon discovered, is through the Small Estate Administration, which in New York State’s case is run out of the Surrogate Court.

The Small Estate Administration (SEA) was enacted in order to enable heirs to obtain property of the deceased without probate, or with shortened probate proceedings, provided certain conditions exist:

  • If the estate belonged to a single person, it must be worth less than $30,000.
  • If the estate belonged to a couple, it must be worth less than $46,000.
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